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UV&S Opens NAID Certified Destruction Facility in Topeka

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 24, 2017
TOPEKA, KS – Document Resources, a division of Underground Vaults and Storage, Inc. (UV&S), a privately-held records and information management company announces the opening of a NAID AAA Certified Transfer Processing Station in Topeka for both offsite and mobile destruction services.  Document Resources is the only NAID certified mobile destruction provider based in the city of Topeka.

UV&S has operated an above ground storage facility in Topeka for over 30 years.  As of April, the facility will also provide NAID AAA certified destruction services, the highest security standard in the industry.  The need for secure document destruction continues to grow and UV&S will be able to expand the mobile shredding, offsite shredding, hard drive destruction, and e-waste disposal services in the Topeka area.

Requests for proposals and schedule availability can be obtained by contacting the Topeka operations center at 785-232-0713 or online at www.undergroundvaults.com.

The National Association of Information Destruction (NAID) is the established international trade association for companies providing information destruction services. NAID’s certification program has become the most widely accepted set of rules and guidelines for information destruction. Certified companies are audited, preform background checks on employees, and must follow strict security standards. NAID also continues to work with state and federal governments to improve the protection of private information. For more information about NAID, please visit their website, naidonline.org.

Underground Vaults and Storage, Inc. was established in 1959, and operates three underground and six above-ground secure storage and destruction facilities across four states.  Serving thousands of clients from all over the world, UV&S is perhaps best known for storing millions of items, including movie film, data tapes and paper records for clients within a 650-foot deep salt mine in Kansas.